Pupils Who got Bad Grades Expected to Be Behind

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Around 100,000 pupils in England each year do not achieve a grade 4 pass in English and mathematics – a fifth of all students. This is according to new research, which has labelled the issue as “one of education’s biggest scandals”.

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The study found that half of all pupils who did not pass their GCSEs in maths and English were already falling behind at age five. This suggests that many students struggle to keep up with their peers from a very early age.

Shadow education secretary Bridget Phillipson responded to the findings by accusing the Conservative government of “failing a generation of young people”. She called for urgent action to improve literacy and numeracy levels among primary school pupils.

The research was conducted by the Education Policy Institute (EPI) and sponsored by the Nuffield Foundation. It looked at data from over half a million pupils born between 2000 and 2002, following them through their education until they took their GCSEs.

The EPI’s report recommends several measures to improve outcomes for all pupils, including:

– Providing extra support for struggling pupils in the early years of primary school

– Encouraging schools to focus on developing basic literacy and numeracy skills

– Better monitoring of pupil progress to identify those falling behind early on.

Implementing these recommendations could help to reduce the number of students who leave school without adequate English and maths skills. This, in turn, could improve social mobility and help to close the attainment gap between rich and poor pupils.

Also, the government plans to invest £350 million in a new “national Tutoring Programme”, which will provide extra support for pupils who are struggling with their studies. However, this is unlikely to be enough to close the attainment gap.

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Much more needs to be done to improve outcomes for all pupils in England. The EPI’s report provides a useful starting point for addressing this issue.

According to the research, 18% of students in England do not achieve a grade 4 pass in both English and maths. This is equivalent to around 100,000 pupils each year. The study also found that half of all pupils who did not pass their GCSEs in maths and English fell behind at age five.

This suggests that many students struggle to keep up with their peers from a very early age. The report’s authors say this is “one of education’s biggest scandals”. They argue that the issue needs to be addressed urgently, as it negatively impacts social mobility and widens the attainment gap between rich and poor pupils.

The EPI’s report recommends several measures to improve outcomes for all pupils, including:

– Providing extra support for struggling pupils in the early years of primary school

– Encouraging schools to focus on developing basic literacy and numeracy skills

– Better monitoring of pupil progress to identify those falling behind early on.

Implementing these recommendations could help to reduce the number of students who leave school without adequate English and maths skills. This, in turn, could improve social mobility and help to close the attainment gap between rich and poor pupils.

However, the government’s plans to invest £350 million in a new “national Tutoring Programme” are unlikely to be enough to close the attainment gap on its own. The EPI’s report provides a useful starting point for addressing this issue, but much more needs to be done to improve outcomes for all pupils in England.

This is an important issue because the attainment gap impacts social mobility. Pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds are less likely to achieve good GCSE grades, limiting their life options. For example, they may struggle to get into good universities or secure well-paid jobs.

Closing the attainment gap would help to improve social mobility and create a fairer society. It would also boost the economy, as businesses would access a larger pool of skilled workers. The government should therefore make addressing this issue a priority.

What do you think is the government’s responsibility regarding education?

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