Schools with Low Ofsted Ratings to be Intervened

Schools with two or more consecutive Ofsted ratings below ‘Good’ may be matched with a strong multi-academy trust to support their improvement. The government laid regulations in Parliament yesterday, Thursday 30 June, to enable this to happen from 01 September.

 

The government’s 55 Education Investment Areas, where education standards are particularly low, will be the first to benefit from the new powers. This is part of a wider package of measures announced last week to drive up education standards across the country.

 

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said:

 

“Every child deserves a high-quality education – no matter where they live. That’s why we are committed to levelling up opportunities for young people to fulfil their potential regardless of their background.

 

“The new intervention powers announced today will help to drive up standards in schools that have been underperforming for too long. This is part of our wider package of measures to raise the bar for education and ensure every child gets the excellent teaching they deserve.”

 

Under the new regulations, when an Ofsted inspection finds a school has been rated ‘Inadequate’ or ‘Requires Improvement’ for two consecutive checks, the Department for Education may ask a strong multi-academy trust (MAT) to intervene. The MAT would then work with the local authority and other partners to develop an improvement plan for the school.

 

The government is also working with the Education and Skills Funding Agency to implement a new process for identifying and intervening in underperforming sixth-form colleges. This will be piloted in the North West from September 2021 before being rolled out across the country.

 

In addition, the department is consulting on making it easier for outstanding schools to convert to academies and sponsor other schools and on changes to ensure all MATs are high quality. The consultation will close on 28 September 2020.

Ofsted

The intervention powers are part of a wider package of measures announced last week to raise educational standards, which includes:

 

– A new National Tutoring Programme to boost the resilience of disadvantaged pupils and those facing disruption to their education because of coronavirus

– A new £1 billion catch-up premium to ensure every child, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds, receives the targeted support they need to catch up

 

– A £200 million investment in special educational needs and disability (SEND) provision to improve access to high-quality SEND places and reduce waiting times for children and young people with an Education, Health and Care Plan

– A £700 million investment to deliver 50,000 additional out-of-school childcare places by September 2022, so parents can return to work with the peace of mind that their children are being looked after safely.

– A £10 million investment to trial targeted catch-up support in a small number of schools over the summer to help pupils make up for lost time

– A consultation on making it easier for outstanding schools to convert to academies and sponsor other schools, as well as on changes to ensure all MATs are high quality. The consultation will close on 28 September 2020.

 

The government is also working with the Education and Skills Funding Agency to implement a new process for identifying and intervening in underperforming sixth-form colleges. This will be piloted in the North West from September 2021 before being rolled out across the country.

 

What else should the government implement to help advance the academics taught at low-rating institutions? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

For more updates regarding international education, follow us on IPGCE and WeChat.

WeChat Code:

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.