Pay Rise of 3%, not Enough to Stop Strike

Even though the government is reportedly considering a 5% pay rise for teachers in England, teaching unions have warned that strikes may still be called. This is because, after considering inflation, the proposed pay rise would still amount to a pay cut. This is according to Mary Bousted, the joint general secretary of the National Education Union (NEU). The School Teachers’ Review Body advised the government on pay and told the Department for Education (DfE) that its proposal for a 3% rise for experienced teachers was inadequate. The Review Body has instead recommended a 5% pay rise.

The School Teachers’ Review Body is an independent panel advising the government on paying for school teachers in England and Wales. It was established by the School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Act of 1991.

 

The School Teachers’ Review Body advised the government on pay and told the Department for Education (DfE) that its proposal for a 3% rise for experienced teachers was inadequate. The Review Body has instead recommended a 5% pay rise. However, it is unclear if the government will accept this recommendation.

 

Teaching unions will likely call strikes if the government does not agree to the 5% pay rise. This would disrupt schools and students across England.

With the current situation regarding COVID-19, it is unclear how feasible strikes would be. It is also unclear how much support they would receive from teachers, as many are already struggling to cope with the challenges posed by the pandemic.

pay rise

Patrick Roach, the general secretary of the NASUWT teaching union, said: “The government cannot ignore the findings of its own independent pay review body and think that it can get away with anything less than a 5% pay rise. For all teachers.”

 

Bousted also warned that the proposed pay rise would not be enough to make up for years of real-term pay cuts. She said: “This would merely be restoring some of the value that has been lost since 2010. Even with a 5% pay award, teachers will still be over £5,000 a year worse off in real terms than in 2010.”

 

A spokesperson for the Department for Education said: “We have always been clear that we want to see teachers’ pay rise, which is why we submitted evidence to the School Teachers’ Review Body calling for pay increases.

 

“The STRB is due to publish its recommendations before the end of this month, based on proposals by the government and submissions from school leaders and teaching unions.”

 

in addition, a spokesperson for the Department for Education said: “We have always been clear that we want to see teachers’ pay rise, which is why we submitted evidence to the School Teachers’ Review Body calling for pay increases.”

 

The government is under pressure to increase teachers’ pay. However, it remains to be seen if they agree to the 5% pay rise recommended by the School Teachers’ Review Body. If they don’t, teaching unions will likely call for strikes, which could disrupt schools and students across England.

 

 

What do you think about this situation? Should the government accept the 5% pay rise recommendation? Or do you think teachers should take a pay cut to avoid strikes during the current pandemic? Let us know your thoughts by adding us on WeChat and by following us on IPGCE.com

 

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