Education Leaders Warn Funding Shortage

Leaders of 13 organisations, including the Confederation of School Trusts, the NAHT school leaders’ union, the Association of Schools and Colleges, and the National Governance Association, have today written to all Conservative MPs warning that schools in their constituencies will see an average shortfall of up to £45,000 for primary schools and £210,000 for secondary schools by 2022-23 if the government does not act.

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The letter warns that this would have a “devastating impact” on schools, which are already struggling to cope with significant budget cuts. It urges MPs to consider this when selecting the next prime minister and encourages them to commit to returning school funding to 2010 levels in real terms.

The letter comes as the Conservative Party prepares to select a new prime minister, with the final two candidates – Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt – pledging to increase school funding if elected.

However, the education sector leaders warn that these promises “fall far short” of what is needed to address the funding crisis in schools. They point out that, even if the government does meet its manifesto commitment to increase school funding by £7.1 billion by 2022-23, this will still leave a significant shortfall.

The letter concludes by urging MPs to select a prime minister who will commit to returning school funding to 2010 levels in real terms, warning that anything less would be a “dereliction of duty”.

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According to the letter, schools in England face a funding crisis that will have a “devastating impact” on pupils, teachers and the whole education system. It warns that school standards will decline unless the government addresses the issue, and education opportunities will be reduced.

The letter urges MPs to consider this when selecting the next prime minister and encourages them to commit to returning school funding to 2010 levels in real terms. The letter estimates that this would require an extra £2 billion of investment every year.

The education sector leaders warn that anything less would be a “dereliction of duty” and leave schools struggling to cope with ever-increasing budget cuts. They point out that, even if the government does meet its manifesto commitment to increase school funding by £7.1 billion by 2022-23, this will still leave a significant shortfall.

The letter concludes by urging MPs to select a prime minister who will commit to returning school funding to 2010 levels in real terms, warning that anything less would be a “dereliction of duty”.

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