90,000 A-level Students’ Dedication

While the rail strike caused some disruptions, students could make it to their A-level exams on time thanks to the efforts of classmates, parents and teachers. Sleepovers, car-sharing rides and minibus drives ensured that those affected by the rail strike would not miss their exams. This shows the dedication of students and adults, similar to ensuring that nothing gets in the way of a student’s education.

 

With around 280,000 pupils taking GCSE history and nearly 90,000 students taking A-level maths, the rail strike could have significantly impacted exam results. However, thanks to the quick thinking and dedication of those involved, students were still able to sit their exams and achieve the best results possible.

As well as the inconvenience caused by the rail strike, it highlights the importance of a robust public transport system. The Strike highlights how essential railways are for commuters and students and how disrupting this service can affect many people’s lives. This is especially true for those who rely on the railway to get to work or school.

 

Teachers have provided flexibility to students wherever possible, with some exam boards offering to move the date of exams or allow students to take them early. This has been a huge help to students who have been affected by the rail strike and has meant that they have not had to miss out on their exams.

 

The NHS has also been supporting those affected by the rail strike, with staff working extra shifts to ensure that patients can still get the care they need. This is just one example of how the NHS goes above and beyond to support the community during this disruption.

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Despite the challenges faced by students, parents and teachers, it is clear that everyone is pulling together to ensure that exams go ahead as planned. This highlights the commitment of all involved to providing that students can succeed, no matter what obstacles are in their way.

 

Siobhán Lowe, the headteacher of Tolworth girl’s school and sixth form in Surbiton, Kingston upon Thames, said: “We warned students and staff so they could organise sleepovers and lifts.”

 

Schools in other parts of the country told exam candidates to contact if they were likely to face travel difficulties and recruited parents to offer car rides through WhatsApp groups. Some schools used minivans to pick up pupils, although one school said no students took up their offer.

 

Pepe Diiasio, the head of Wales high school in Rotherham, said: “Our plan B was to send out a whole group email at 3 pm yesterday telling students not to worry, that we would make sure they got their exams.”

 

Despite the challenges faced by students, parents and teachers, it is clear that everyone is pulling together to ensure that exams go ahead as planned. This highlights the commitment of all involved to providing that students can succeed, no matter what obstacles are in their way.

 

According to the Department of Education, schools should “prioritise their spending to support their pupils and students and can consider making available funding for pupils and students who may require it.” However, no additional funding is available. This puts the burden on already stretched school budgets to cover the costs of alternative travel methods for students.

 

Sarah Hannafin, a senior policy adviser at the National Association of Head Teachers, said: “We are concerned by the suggestion, made by the DfE, that schools are best placed on funding alternative methods of travel. This is false, and schools have not been given the funding to do this. When budgets are already tight, this is an unfair ask of schools.”

 

The rail strike has caused significant disruption to students, parents and teachers. However, everyone works together to ensure that exams go ahead. This highlights the commitment of all involved to providing that students can succeed, no matter what obstacles are in their way.

If you are an A-level student struggling to cope with the workload, it is important to seek help from your teachers or other support networks. There are also many online resources available that can help you manage your workload and stay on track with your studies. More information about the results here